Bliznet Email Setup for iPhone

April 7th, 2014

If you have email service with Blizzard Digital and would like to set up your iPhone to receive your email, follow this tutorial. (Instructions are based on iPhone 5C running iOS 7.)

Step 1: From your home screen, tap the “Settings” icon.

iPhone Email Setup, Step 1

Step 2: On the “Settings” screen, scroll down and tap “Mail, Contacts, Calendars”.

iPhone Email Setup, Step 2

Step 3: On the “Mail, Contacts, Calendars” screen, tap “Add Account”

iPhone Email Setup, Step 3

Step 4: On the “Add Account” screen, you will be prompted to choose a mail provider. Tap “Other”.

iPhone Email Setup, Step 4

Step 5: On the following screen, tap “Add Mail Account”.

iPhone Email Setup, Step 5

Step 6: On the “New Account” screen, enter your email account information. “Name” is the name you want people to see when they receive email from you. “Email” is your full email address. Password is your email account password. Description is the account’s name that you will see in your own email app. When finished, tap “Next” at the top right corner.

iPhone Email Setup, Step 6

Step 7: You will be prompted to enter server information. In the “Host Name” fields (one each for “Incoming Mail Server” and “Outgoing Mail Server”), enter “mail.bliznet.com”. In the “User Name” fields (one each for “Incoming Mail Server” and “Outgoing Mail Server”) enter your full email address, and your email account password in both “Password” fields. (You may need to scroll down to see the “Outgoing Mail Server” fields — see the second screenshot below.) When you are finished entering your information, tap “Next” at the top right of the screen and you are finished!

iPhone Email Setup, Step 7 iPhone Email Setup, Step 7

 

Part 2: If you are unable to send email…

Once you have set up your account, the default outgoing mail server settings may not work for your specific situation. Here’s what to do in this case.

Step 1: From your home screen, tap the “Settings” icon.

iPhone Outgoing Server Correction, Part 1

Step 2: On the “Settings” screen, scroll down and tap “Mail, Contacts, Calendars”.

iPhone Outgoing Server Correction, Part 2

Step 3: On the “Mail, Contacts, Calendars” screen, tap the name of your email account.

iPhone Outgoing Server Correction, Part 3

Step 4: On the following screen, tap your email address.

iPhone Outgoing Server Correction, Part 4

Step 5: On the following screen, scroll down to “Outgoing Mail Server” and tap “SMTP”.

iPhone Outgoing Server Correction, Part 5

Step 6: On the following screen, tap the name of your Primary Server (should say “mail.bliznet.com”)

iPhone Outgoing Server Correction, Part 6

Step 7: On the following screen, verify that your User Name and Password are entered correctly and the settings are as follows:

Host Name: mail.bliznet.com
Use SSL: On (green)
Authentication: MD5 Challenge-Response
Server Port: 587

Then tap “Done” at the top right and you are finished.

iPhone Outgoing Server Correction, Part 7

Bliznet Email Setup with Microsoft Outlook

April 3rd, 2014

To begin using your email account hosted by Blizzard Digital, you’ll need to know your email address and the password to your account, then follow these instructions.

Step 1: Open Outlook and enter the “Account Settings” screen. In Outlook 2007 and older, open the “Tools” menu and click “Account Settings”. In Outlook 2010 – 2013, open the “File” menu and click “Account Settings”. Then click the “New…” button.

Step 2: You will see the following screen:

Bliznet Email Setup for Outlook - Step 1

Select “Microsoft Exchange, POP3, IMAP, or HTTP” and click “Next”.

Step 3: You will see the following screen:

Bliznet Email Setup for Outlook - Step 2

Put a check mark in “Manually configure server settings or additional server types” and click “Next”.

Step 4: You will see the following screen:

Bliznet Email Setup for Outlook - Step 3

Select “Internet E-mail” and click “Next”.

Step 5: You will see the following screen:

Bliznet Email Setup for Outlook - Step 4

Enter the information as seen here, replacing “Your Name” with your name and “your@emailaddr.ess” with your email address. If you will be checking your email from multiple locations or devices (for example, your office computer, home computer, and phone) then change “Account Type” from “POP3″ to “IMAP”. Once you have entered your information, click “More Settings”.

Step 6: On the “More Settings” screen, click the “Outgoing Server” tab. You will see the following screen:

Bliznet Email Setup for Outlook - Step 5

Put a check mark in “My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication”, then click the “Advanced” tab.

Step 7: You will see the following screen:

Bliznet Email Setup for Outlook - Step 6

Change the “Outgoing server (SMTP):” to 587 and “Use the following type of encrypted connection:” to “TLS”. If you chose IMAP instead of POP3 on Step 5, some options on this screen will appear slightly different, but you may leave the default settings. Click “OK”.

Step 8: You will see the following screen:

Bliznet Email Setup for Outlook - Step 7

Click “Next” and then “Finish”.

You are now ready to use your email!

Website: Sharptop Office Suites

March 22nd, 2013

Sharptop Property Investors of Jasper, Georgia recently chose Blizzard Digital to host, design, and build a website to promote their commercial building for lease. After discussing their specifications, we got to work on a design. With this being a small, information-driven site, we decided to do something a bit different: a single page, flowing, dynamic design that takes advantage of the full size of the viewing area.

Take a look at our latest website design: Jasper Office Space at 35 N. Main St. from Sharptop Property Investors

Jasper Office Suites

HTML 5, Microdata, and You

November 2nd, 2011

Howdy, everybody. I have finally returned to convey some more information regarding the technical side of web design. Today’s topic is HTML5 and microdata.

I have recently begun using HTML 5 instead of XHMTL 1.0. The spec for HTML 5 is still a long way off from being a W3 “recommendation,” but I decided to switch to it because of “microdata”. Microdata, or Rich Snippets as Google calls them, are a way to mark up the information on your web site to be more machine readable, such as products or addresses. For example, you can use it to tell search engines that a portion of your page pertains to a specific product, pointing out exactly what makes up the name of the product, the price, its image, and so on. The following code example is pretty typical for an individual product’s info (obviously simplified for this example):

<div class="product">
	<div class="name">The Web Site Maker</div>
	<div class="price">$99.99</div>
	<div class="description">This is the incredible Web Site Maker. No longer
		do you have to get your hands dirty. This software contains a single
		button. Push to receive web site.</div>
	<img src="web-site-maker.png" alt="The Web Site Maker" />
</div>

However, a search engine doesn’t necessarily know what all that means. Google’s pretty scary and can probably decipher all that, but, with microdata, we can help by marking exactly what each bit of info means. As follows:

<div class="product" itemscope="itemscope" itemtype="http://schema.org/Product">
	<div class="name" itemprop="name">The Web Site Maker</div>
	<div class="price" itemprop="offers" itemscope="itemscope"
		itemtype="http://schema.org/Offer"><span itemprop="price">
		$99.99</span></div>
	<div class="description" itemprop="description">This is the incredible Web Site
		Maker. No longer do you have to get your hands dirty. This software
		contains a single button. Push to receive web site.</div>
	<img itemprop="image" src="web-site-maker.png" alt="The Web Site Maker" />
</div>

What is this itemscope and itemtype stuff, you may be wondering. These are attributes new to HTML 5, and thus the reason for switching to it. These attributes are legal on nearly any element and are used to mark up our data. The itemscope attribute is used to mark an element as the container for a particular item—in this case, a product. In the example, it means everything inside the element with the itemscope attribute is information about this particular product. It’s within the “scope” of this product. As an aside, you may notice that itemscope “equals” itemscope in the example. This is only because I am using the XHTML flavor of HTML 5. If you were using the HTML variant, you could just use itemscope on its own without the ="itemscope" portion.

After itemscope comes itemtype="http://schema.org/Product". As the name implies, it specifies the type of item for the machine reader to expect. “Product” is one of a plethora of types you can use, a list of which can be found at Schema.org.

Moving on, itemprop="name" obviously specifies the name of the product. “Name” is a property of the “Product” type. The Schema.org web site shows in detail the properties of each type, usually with examples, under their schemas section. Some properties, however, are more than a simple text value. Some are actually an itemtype of their own, such as the price of the product. It is not merely an itemprop="price" with a number inside, but an “Offer” type. So it is necessary to again add the itemscope and itemtype attributes. I also had to add an extra element—the span—inside the price div so I could apply the “price” property, a property of “Offer”.

The rest of the example is just made up of some additional itemprop attributes. After you’ve marked up your information, you can use Google’s Rich Snippets Testing Tool to make sure it’s marked up correctly.

If you’re already using some form of XHTML, it should be a pretty simple matter of changing the doctype and replacing your <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="mime-type; charset=utf-8" /> (or whatever you may be using) with a simple <meta charset="UTF-8" /> to convert to valid HTML 5. It’s not necessary to use the new elements such as header or section. Your old div elements will work fine. It’s probably not even desirable at this point to utilize the new elements thanks to the inability of Internet Explorer 8 and lower to display them without a hack.

Welcome to the future. I hope you can start using microdata (AKA Rich Snippets) to make the web a more semantic place. Don’t forget to check out Schema.org for all the supported types and their properties. Have fun, web wizards!

Valid Flash Embed and Preloaders Episode V: Internet Explorer Strikes Back

November 2nd, 2010

If you saw my previous post on valid Flash embed while maintaining preload functionality and used it, be warned: when the user does not have Flash, a lovely <![endif]--> will appear in IE where the Flash movie would normally be. The only way around it I’ve found is to actually duplicate everything from the opening object tag to the closing one so there is one each for IE and Firefox. For example:

<!--[if !IE]>-->
<object data="movie.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="725" height="235">
	<param name="movie" value="movie.swf" />
</object>
<!--<![endif]-->
<!--[if IE]>
<object classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" width="725" height="235">
	<param name="movie" value="movie.swf" />
</object>
<![endif]-->

Definitely a pain, but I’ve found no other way around it.

Also in my search for a solution, I discovered that our old pal Internet Explorer does not let you append anything but param elements to object elements in Javascript. That was pretty frustrating. Don’t try that. It doesn’t work.